Tag Archives forwriters block

The Parts You’re Afraid to Write

Before I get started writing a story or novel, I always have those parts which excite me. You know what I’m talking about. The inspirational part driving the whole thing in the first place. The Spark. The Beautiful Mistress. Maybe it’s a character arc or a climactic scene that changes everything. Maybe it’s a big, surprising reveal in the story. Somewhere along the way you come up with an idea and say, “That’s it! Wouldn’t it be so cool to write that scene?”

Well, you’re 50,000 words into the story and you finally reach the penultimate moment. It’s all come together for this one part. It’s your time to shine. Your time to make it a magical piece of writing.

But, suddenly, you buckle and collapse under the pressure. Writer’s block takes hold. The one part you were waiting to write, your beautiful mistress has metamorphosed into a gargantuan eight-tentacled slug beast with gallons of slime falling off of its gelatinous flesh.

How to Silence Your Internal Editor

In my past article How I Write 3,000 Words Per HourI talk about the idea of keeping the door closed when you write and keeping it open when you edit. Of course, the phrase is not entirely literal. When you’re writing your first draft you shouldn’t bother yourself with critiquing and editing every last sentence. Too many writers think the first draft should be perfect, and if it’s anything less, they have to start all over. Other writers trudge through a bog of their own making, continuously re-writing their first paragraph. They get so drained and exhausted. It’s no wonder why they give up.

Believe it or not many, many writers do this (and have done this) throughout the ages. J.R.R. Tolkien plagued his first drafts with overt perfectionism and would throw dozens of copies away because he wasn’t satisfied. In the meantime, his best pal, C.S. Lewis, wrote book after book with ease.

You’re a writer. If you want to finish your projects like Professor Lewis, then it’s time you started acting like one. Here are five tips for writing faster and silencing your inner editor:

How I Write 3,000 Words Per Hour

A while ago, a friend told me about a technique where you could write 5,000 words per hour. It’s from a book called, surprise, 5,000 Words Per Hour by Chris Fox. The book is good and has plenty of tips, tricks, and techniques to squeeze the most out of your precious writing time.

Last winter I took a little retreat and utilized his technique. It didn’t quite work the way he promised, but it did give me the added benefit of writing faster than before.

Here’s the ultimate problem with trying to write 5,000 words per hour.