Category Archives for Books

10 Books That Changed My Life

I write for a living. Writing and reading are what I love to do most. So I figured I’d throw down some of the most important books which changed my thinking and shaped the writer and man I am today. There isn’t a doubt in my mind I forgot a book on this list but these are the ones that rose to the top first.

Sci-fi Novel ‘Of Song and Singularity’ is Now on Kindle Unlimited

I’m happy to announce that my science fiction novel, Of Song and Singularity, is now available on Kindle Unlimited. Allowing people to have access to thousands of titles, Kindle Unlimited is essentially Netflix for books. Voracious readers would find it the most enticing as they can read as much as they want. So, whether you’re already signed up or want to sign up for my book, it’s now easier than ever to access my books.

Of Song and Singularity is a young adult science fiction novel about Wrenna, a teenager living in a utopian world governed by an artificially intelligent being. But not all is truly right with her world and her cozy, luxurious lifestyle will be turned on its head before too long. In order to survive the vicious realities of her world, she must put her trust in her father and the people she meets along her journey. But ultimately she must put more trust in herself. 

So, why bring it to Kindle Unlimited? Well, Kindle Unlimited provides a unique opportunity for authors to connect with their readers in a way they haven’t ever before. By giving Kindle Unlimited readers access to Of Song and Singularity, I’m able to provide this product to more readers and also able to give current readers access to it as well. It’s an all around win-win situation. I think Kindle Unlimited is just another great tool for authors to utilize and considering Amazon’s larger reader ecosystem, it felt like a no-brainer.

Valentine’s Day, Orphan’s Hollow Part 2 Release & A Bad Back

The up and down nature of life is one of those mysteries I don’t think humanity will ever fully comprehend. And I think that’s why we love to tell stories so much because it helps us think through it, process it, feel it in a way that puts it in perspective.

The other day, I released Part 2 of my serial Orphan’s HollowIt’s exclusively available on Amazon and Kindle Unlimited. Anyway, I ran a promotion on Valentine’s day and it hit the #2 spot on one of their charts. So, needless to say, that was fun to see and exciting. At the same time, I took a trip up to Duluth as a small getaway with my wife. Also, fantastic.

It’s these high moments I try to appreciate the most. To soak all the small things up as best that I can. Because the present gets swept away by the future in a heartbeat and if you let it, you could miss all of it. So, needless to say, I really enjoyed February 14th, 2017.

A Public Library

I wrote in the library this morning. Well, more like edited, but same thing, right? It was quieter than usual. Most days children swarm around the kid’s books making all kinds of noises while the adults goof around on the computers, doing pretty much anything other than reading. Libraries have become all things to all people, I guess. The books stare longingly at the children and adults who would much rather stare at an illuminated computer screen.

I’m one of those adults. Somedays I’ll go to the library to check out books or look at their “For Sale” section, but it’s rare. Whenever I’m in the mood to check out books, I usually take way too many than I actually need. The librarians probably think I’m crazy with the stack of books I run off with. And yes, I’ve racked up quite the fines in my day (mostly college), but I do better at returning them on time now.

Facing Death in ‘Pet Sematary’

Some time ago while I lay on the couch, a wave of thought came over me – What is the nature of death? Our own existence is what we’ve known since birth and contemplating the end of existence feels like a foreign invader. The idea that all of this will cease struck me, it struck me to the core. I felt hollow inside and numb. I lay there for almost an hour, still, staring up at the popcorn ceiling. Boy, was that a horrible feeling. There’s nothing productive about those kinds of thoughts and I haven’t delved back in since, but I did come to one truth: Death is scary and it’s assured.

Pet Sematary deals with this very topic. The main character, Louis Creed, faces it at every turn throughout the novel. A general physician working at the University, Creed believes death is the natural order of things. However, when his neighbor, Jud, takes Louis and his family out to the pet cemetery behind their house, his journey with death begins. It feels only natural that a story about cemeteries would deal quite heavily with the topic of death, and King provides. Death is the central figure in the entire story if not the main antagonist.